‘Views From The Edge’

 

The impact of human neglect on the planet is more evident every day, are we addressing it enough, are we being blasé and complacent that will ‘all be ok’? The planet is slowly choking on plastic, waste, debris and the ever-increasing effect of our consumeristic society is ultimately having a major impact on our fragile and beautiful environment.

Views from the edge is a body of work that merges the real and the possible, the now and the future – the work references the ugliness that will be present from plastic pollution and that is more than present all over the world. Sea clutter.

The images reflect a glimpse of the future, a view of the UK’s coastline, polluted waters, tides cluttered, and sea animals choked with our manmade waste.

The photographs I have incorporated in the artworks are shot from recent trips to Norfolk, and merged with local city ‘rubbish’. Mini portals that suggest our current state. The pieces are intentionally subtle, a quick glance suggests it’s just a seascape, and all is well as the colours blend and tease the eye. But on further inspection, the playful constructions are voicing what is actually going on in our sea, an undercurrent of destruction. Using physical photographic prints and stamping out circular images these 3D ‘sculptures’ are hand built, and the layers are rephotographed. Unstable and off balanced, yet both aspects of the view being recognisable. A personal frustration with how man’s creations obscures part of the view. Juxtaposing the ugliness of our disposable society with the incredible skyline and seashores.

Everything mankind does, makes an impression and dent on nature and our environment, my work merges new and old memories of our landscape and planets vulnerability. Will our shores still look beautiful in 20 year’s time, I fear not, there is denial and ignorance to the disposal of our recycling, where does it really end up, landfill, incineration, abroad, and where will it eventually reappear? The compositions intend  lead to numerous interpretations, however it’s not that at difficult to make your own conclusions to our future - there is still some time to respond, if we do act. We can prevent more sea clutter.

2021